Douglas A-26 Invader

The A-26, the last aircraft designated as an "attack bomber," was designed to replace the Douglas A-20 Havoc/Boston. It incorporated many improvements over the earlier Douglas designs. The first three XA-26 prototypes first flew in July 1942, and each was configured differently: Number One as a daylight bomber with a glass nose, Number Two as a gun-laden night-fighter, and Number Three as a ground-attack platform, with a 75-millimeter cannon in the nose. This final variant, eventually called the A-26B, was chosen for production.

Upon its delivery to the 9th Air Force in Europe in November 1944 (and the Pacific Theater shortly thereafter), the A-26 became the fastest US bomber of WWII. The A-26C, with slightly-modified armament, was introduced in 1945. Following the war, the A-26 was updated and adapted as the needs of the new U.S. Air Force changed. It is the only combat aircraft to see active service in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam.

Photos were scanned from the personal album of Capt. Maurice Langford.








Army Air Forces Airplane Insignia

1st Air Force Insignia 2nd Air Force Insignia 3rd Air Force Insignia 4th Air Force Insignia 5th Air Force Insignia 6th Air Force Insignia 7th Air Force Insignia 8th Air Force Insignia 9th Air Force Insignia 10th Air Force Insignia 11th Air Force Insignia 12th Air Force Insignia 13th Air Force Insignia 14th Air Force Insignia 15th Air Force Insignia 20th Air Force Insignia